EntreEd Forum 2018: When Those Who Teach Also Do What They Teach (Part 3 of 3)

October 3, 2018

It’s one thing to sit through conference presentations designed to help you learn more about a field that interests you; it’s quite another to participate in a conference which offers you opportunities to practice what you’re learning—which is exactly what happened wonderfully, helpfully, and engagingly during the second half of the three-day 2018 EntreEd Forum near Pittsburgh over the weekend.

The conference, organized through EntreEd (the National Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education)—an organization dedicated to “providing advocacy, leadership, networking, technical assistance, and resources nationally for [entrepreneurship] students and teachers”—was an incredibly immersive experience from start to finish. It offered a perfect approach for a gathering of educators interested in learning how to more effectively incorporate entrepreneurship into the work we do with learners across the United States. We spent our first morning together in a Student Entrepreneurship Showcase that gave us a wonderful opportunity to talk with those budding entrepreneurs who were onsite to describe and sell products they had made in school. We began that first afternoon learning from Grable Foundation Executive Director Gregg Behr’s keynote address about the intersection of entrepreneurship, learning, and community in Pittsburgh, then spent time in breakout groups exploring a variety of topics related to embedding entrepreneurship training into every possible setting within our education system.

Another keynote address on the second morning was followed by our participation in a variety of breakout sessions facilitated by conference attendees. By the time we finished hearing the lunchtime keynote address delivered by Nick Staples, the young entrepreneur who created the quickly-growing West Virginia-based Zenergy Cycling company, we were primed for the moment of transition: when participants were given the afternoon to develop pitches for entrepreneurial projects to be funded through cash prizes during a pitch contest to be held on the final morning we were to be together.

EntreEd representatives worked with the prospective competitors throughout the afternoon to help them develop the five-minute pitches they would deliver the following morning. And, as is the case with any great learning opportunity, this one was firmly grounded in producing something that could not only be used during the pitch contest, but long after the prospective entrepreneurs returned to their communities regardless of whether they actually won any of the cash prizes ($1,000, $750, and $500) to be awarded.

Projects pitched onsite, after a final keynote session on Preparing Teachers & Students for the Future world of work, included:

*A snack cart offering students nutritious snacks throughout the day; snacks have informational nutrition tags so students learn while snacking

*VRJ (Viking Restorative Justice) program, featuring community business leaders working with students; students apply lessons learned to develop pitches to improve their school

*A program to support high-school students who have taken on role of primary caregivers at home and often have to skip their classes; funding would allow them to spend more time in school

*Creating Opportunities Youth Conference, a one-day conference by youths for youths to foster entrepreneurial skills

*Art through the Ages, for disadvantaged elementary school students (often homeless) to collaborate on creating art they can sell; products based on that art would be produced by middle-schoolers

*Entrepreneur Night, during which students could pitch and sell products they create themselves so they become aware of business opportunities in a county where employment opportunities are extremely limited

*The Collaboratory, a maker zone in a school library to allow students to explore, build and tinker in ways that would nurture essential workplace skills; the project was pitched as a catalyst for future change

*A program fostering entrepreneurship among those who have lost their jobs

*Appalachian STEMS: Blossoming STEM Interest Among Appalachian Girls to make them #STEMStrong

*Student-designed, student-produced Koozies created within the context of a school textiles class

*BBQ (Begin, Build, Quit), a proposal to create a community BBQ pit that becomes a meeting place and site for events to strengthen community that has a very high death rate from overdoses

When the three judges returned to announce the results, they provided an unexpected example of entrepreneurship in action: having decided that they could not make a decision between two equally strong second-prize candidates, one of them—Rebecca Corbin, Executive Director at The National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE)—offered to provide a second $750 second-place cash award through her organization so that four educator-entrepreneurs could return to their communities with funding for their projects.

Seeing what will come from the efforts of the winners—which included the first-prize award to BBQ—will carry the work of the conference forward. Seeing what will come from sharing these ideas among our peers and others we know will extend, even more, the reach of EntreEd, the 2018 EntreEd Forum, and those who were inspired by the event.

N.B. – This is the third of three posts inspired by attendance at the2018 EntreEd Forum, near Pittsburgh. Next: Encouraging Teachers of Entrepreneurship to Work as Entrepreneurs

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EntreEd Forum 2018: EveryLibrary, Entrepreneurship, and Makerspaces (Part 2 of 3)

September 30, 2018

I have never before tried to turn a conference session space into a makerspace, nor have I ever been part of conference that, essentially, turned into a makerspace. But that’s what magically and seamlessly happened here just outside of Pittsburgh this weekend during the 2018 EntreEd Forum, organized through EntreEd (the National Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education)—an organization dedicated to “providing advocacy, leadership, networking, technical assistance, and resources nationally for [entrepreneurship] students and teachers.”

EveryLibrary Founder/Executive Director John Chrastka, teacher/librarian/Foundry Makerspace Fellow Heather Lister, and I were here with support from EveryLibrary to facilitate a 45-minute session on the topic of “Entrepreneurship, Schools, & Library Makerspaces.” John, Heather, and I—with encouragement and plenty of enthusiasm from EntreEd Executive Director Gene Coulson and The EdVenture Group Senior Program Manager Jennifer Wotring—designed a highly-interactive session meant to help participants increase their awareness of the possibilities for incorporating makerspaces into their ongoing efforts to help learners develop entrepreneurial skills that will serve them well as they enter our quickly-evolving work environment.

There was nothing upfront to hint that the hotel conference room we were using was about to become a makerspace. And, frankly, the three of us facilitating the session did not walk into that room with the intention of creating a makerspace where we could help colleagues better understand how makerspaces and entrepreneurship can quickly and easily be interwoven. But after we provided initial reminders that makerspaces do not have to be high-cost endeavors—a theme that ran through many conversations here this weekend—and are not necessarily as much about 3D printers and other high-tech tools as they are about creating spaces where we learn by creating, we turned the conference room into a no-cost, low-tech, highly productive makerspace through three simple actions you can easily replicate:

*Declaring the room a makerspace

*Asking session participants—our co-learners, co-creators, co-conspirators in learning—to quickly rearrange their chairs so they would all see, interact with, and collaborate with each other for the remainder of the session

*Proposing the idea that what we would make together was a rudimentary plan for how each of them could apply makerspace concepts to their own schools as soon as they returned home

The transformation was immediate. Our co-creators took a few minutes sharing, with everyone else in the room, experiences they had with makerspaces; some of the questions they had about makerspaces; and ideas for how little they have needed or would need to create a makerspace to meet their learners’ needs. Among the resources Heather, John, and I added to the makerspace were slides showing how makerspaces support entrepreneurship—including images taken a day earlier of students at the EntreEd 2018 Forum Student Entrepreneurship Showcase displaying their own wares that were at least partially created through school and school-library makerspaces (with strong support from their teachers and school librarians). And with less than 10 minutes remaining in the session, we went around the temporary makerspace to give our co-conspirators in learning an opportunity to tell us what they would do as a result of having been part of the session—in essence giving them the opportunity to put the finishing touches on the rudimentary plans of action they were collaboratively creating in that makerspace.

This story could have easily ended at that moment, but the EntreEd Forum organizers had previously planned the conference activity that inadvertently made the entire conference, from my point of view, a makerspace: an afternoon of activities designed to help these teacher-maker-innovators prepare pitches designed to gain funding for projects that would allow them to more effectively foster entrepreneurship among the learners they serve—a topic to be more fully explored in the next in this three-part set of reflections on the 2018 EntreEd Forum.

John.

Looking  back on the set of experiences I have had here at the conference, I realize there is one other not-yet-acknowledged makerspace: the virtual one (phone calls and email exchanges) that allowed John, Gene, Jennifer and me to create the structure for the session, and the extension of that makerspace into the Google Drive presentation deck that Heather, John, and I created (online and asynchronously, not face to face) for use during the session—a wonderful reminder that, like so many words in our vocabulary, “makerspace” is one that continues to evolve in ways we are just beginning to explore and limited only the limits of our—and your—imaginations. (For more information about EveryLibrary’s efforts to foster entrepreneurship, please visit the organization’s “Entrepreneurs” site on Medium.)

N.B. – This is the second of three posts inspired by attendance at the2018 EntreEd Forum, near Pittsburgh. Next: Encouraging Teachers of Entrepreneurship to Work as Entrepreneurs


EntreEd Forum 2018: Nurturing Tomorrow’s Workforce Today (Pt. 1 of 3)

September 28, 2018

Anyone arriving here in Pittsburgh with the mistaken impression that the pejorative term Rust Belt remains an appropriate description (as I did yesterday) is quickly going to receive a much-needed, extremely positive update—particularly after attending the first day of the 2018 EntreEd Forum. And we’re likely to be spreading the word to teacher-trainer-learners everywhere that Pittsburgh and EntreEd (the National Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education), an organization dedicated to “providing [entrepreneurship] advocacy, leadership, networking, technical assistance, and resources nationally for students and teachers,” are well worth emulating as we seek innovative learning models preparing our youngest learners for the quickly evolving work environments they will soon be occupying.

Fresh off a flight from San Francisco late yesterday afternoon, I was with EntreEd colleagues for a reception in Pittsburgh’s architecturally rich urban landscape for initial conversations about how teachers, learners, and representatives of a variety of organizations are collaborating to address concerns similar to what I’ve seen Jonathan Nalder and others from FutureWe address—including the overarching challenge of helping students develop the skills they will need for the next decade or two to thrive in an environment where nearly half the jobs currently existing may disappear. One answer, integral to the work EntreEd and Forum attendees are doing, is to recognize the growing importance of entrepreneurship  and to help learners develop entrepreneurial skills early and throughout their years in school.

Sublimation Creations students showing their wares to Forum keynote speaker Gregg Berr

The efforts and results are encouraging. Dozens of Pennsylvania students were onsite this morning to participate in a student entrepreneurship showcase—an opportunity for them to show Forum participants what they are doing through entrepreneurship-based curriculum in school and library makerspaces and fab labs (fabrication laboratories). The Productive Panthers from the Austin Area School District, for example, were discussing, displaying, and selling scented soy wax melts they designed and produced with school equipment including 3D printers in the school library. Students from the Bellwood-Antis School District displayed products they produced through their school-based Sublimation Creations business.

Talking with them and students involved in several other wonderful entrepreneurial endeavors shows a depth and level of sophistication that those long out of school may not even suspect exists. Ranging in age from elementary school to high-school level, they eloquently—and enthusiastically—described how the embedding of entrepreneurial education and project-based learning is preparing them to thrive in the workforces they expect to enter. They acknowledged the importance of learning how to start a business; design, create, fabricate, and market products; and develop the communication skills needed to sell those products—skills clearly and impressively on display as teachers from throughout the Appalachian region became those students’ customers during the showcase.

Collaboration was a theme—if not the theme—never far from the surface during  the showcase; a  keynote address on entrepreneurship in learning by Gregg Behr, executive director of The Grable Foundation and co-chair of the Remake Learning Council; and during afternoon EntreCamp sessions designed to provide opportunities for Forum participants to share success stories and resources with their peers so those stories could be adapted and implemented back at home within their own communities. Collaboration was clearly a factor in the success of the Productive Panthers and Sublimation Creations efforts since both benefitted from support from the San Diego-based Real World Scholars program.  Collaboration between Real World Scholars and The Grable Foundation was also obvious to anyone who noticed, on the Real World Scholars website, that the Foundation is one of RWS’s sponsors. And the obvious collaboration between the students and their teachers remains a very encouraging example of what is right in today’s world of education—as opposed to the often-justified complaints so often voiced by those concerned by the disconnect that exists between school and work.

Behr’s engaging keynote address was filled with examples of the spirit of collaboration. Pittsburgh, he told audience members, is gaining a reputation as Kidsburgh for being a great place to be a kid and to raise kids. Remake Learning is helping “ignite engaging, relevant, and equitable learning practices in support of young people navigating rapid social and technological change” (a description I pulled from Remake Learning’s website while Behr was describing the organization’s work). Elizabeth Forward High School’s FABLab was another example he cited of first-rate education in action—an assertion supported by the work of FABLab students who participated in the showcase. And his mention of The Labs at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, supported by Remake Learning, sent me to the library’s website to see the introductory comment: “Teens learn best when their learning is connected to their passions, desires and curiosities.”

“The entrepreneurial mindset needs to be cultivated…it’s not a one-and-done endeavor,” one EntreCamp colleague said as the first day of the Forum was drawing to a close.

It’s inspiring to be here with so many first-rate educators committed to fostering that mindset—and important that we remember that each of us has a role to play in cultivating that mindset, among the learners we serve, to the benefit of the communities in which we work, live, and play.

N.B. — This is the first of three posts inspired by attendance at the 2018 EntreEd Forum near Pittsburgh. Next: EveryLibrary, Entrepreneurship, and Makerspaces

 


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